Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Nursing homes in the Philippines?

  1. #1
    Administrator rolour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 09, 2003
    Location
    Lake in the Hills, IL
    Posts
    13,348
    Blog Entries
    35

    Default Nursing homes in the Philippines?

    Many, many years ago while on vacation back home, I met a wealthy politician (who isn't?) who broached the idea of putting up nursing homes in the Philippines. For foreigners, that is. Japanese, Taiwanese, Europeans, etc. He said then that Japan, for example, is getting too crowded and the old folks want a peaceful existence as senior citizens in a quiet place. My place is perfect, he said, as he bragged about a vast piece of land he owns at a resort town somewhere in southern Luzon. Well, I thought then, if you have the money it's worth a try. He asked about how nursing homes operate in the U.S., how much do patients pay, etc.

    The politician was serious with his plans until he fell from grace - lost the elections, his other businesses went down, and members of his family were murdered by, allegedly, political rivals. And I never heard from him again.

    I really thought the idea would work, but with no investors willing to risk their money, that was the end of it. So it was with great interest that I read a recent article from the Manila Bulletin - Medical tourism in the Philippines. You may read the full article by clicking the link but part of it reads below:

    The Philippines can be a major choice for the Japanese retirees who wish to enjoy the value of their retirement money for goods and services. But what is preventing the Japanese market from considering the Philippines as a retirement and investment (in the hospitality sector) destination? How can our facilities and services be recognized by the Japanese market? What are the opportunities for Philippine business? How can communities benefit from the development of retirement villages?

    In 2003, there could be more than 20 million Japanese aged 60 years and above. The number of senior citizens belonging to this bracket increases not only because of the number of individuals reaching that age level, but also because they tend to live longer. As of 1999, the average life span of a Japanese individual was 77.10 years for males and 84 years for females – the highest life expectancy rate in the world. At the rate in which the demographic structure is changing in Japan, by the year 2025, the number of people aged 60 and over will be highest in Japan, Italy, and Germany.

    Many elderly people in Japan are showing an interest to continue working even after retirement. In fact, the post-retirement period is considered an opportunity to enjoy a “second life.” In contrast to the traditional idea of a retiree as someone who lives in a quiet and inactive environment, a typical Japanese in his second life is still on the move. The second life is evidently a chance to engage oneself in a new range of activities such as sports, arts related hobbies and volunteer work, which are even more exciting if pursued abroad. This is where the concept of overseas multi-habitation (retirees’ pursuit of an alternative way life abroad).

    Recognizing these preferences, the Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) developed Longstay Tourism by facilitating the arrival procedure for tourists aged 55 years and above. According to the study conducted by the TAT for the long stay program, Japanese respondents indicated several major considerations in choosing a retirement destination.

    The Philippines can tap into the Japanese retirees market. It has the manpower, the culture, the resources and the cost structure to make life for the Japanese retiree less stressful and more active.

    The Philippines has both the available manpower and culture to support retirees. The educational system churns about 300,000 to 400,000 graduates every year and about 7% or 21,000 to 28,000 come from medical-related degrees. The abundance of medical service providers in the country is reflected in the endless stream of nurses, physical therapists and care givers from the Philippines going to other countries like the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. With retirees going to the Philippines, these people need not go to these countries and leave their families behind just to earn the levels of income they would get catering to other nationalities. They can provide the same service and perhaps receive the same income levels serving these nationalities here in the Philippines.

    - Manila Bulletin, March 8, 2004
    Seriously now, will nursing homes for foreigners in the Philippines work? And since these foreigners are moneyed themselves, employees' (doctors, nurses) salaries will probably approximate "american salaries" as well. Who's with me?
    Please do not PM me for any questions regarding this site or inquiries that's related to the College of the Medicine. Please post your questions in our Forum or the comments section after each article. Thank you.

    flick
    r

  2. #2

    Default Re: Nursing homes in the Philippines?

    I am with you on this.

    Actually, a few years back a group of doctors talked about putting up a nursing home, but their target was the elderly pinoys. Well, when they started asking around about the feasibility of doing so, they got frustrated with the reactions of family members. Our culture is entirely different from those in the west. Here we are expected and usually do take care of our old parents or relatives in our houses. Needless to say, the plan never took off.

    Now, catering to elderly Japanese and others, that is a different story. We have enough spaces and manpower to handle it ( just look at the many sprouting caretaker courses being offered left and right). But the big question is how would be willing to invest in such an endeavor?

  3. #3

    Default Re: Nursing homes in the Philippines?

    the idea is good but it runs against our culture of taking care of our olds. I myself wouldnt want to think of it as an option when im getting old. here in Belgium it is already institutionalized. At one end it can be beneficial to the olds because they are in a community where they are taken cared of. On the other hand it is one of the major reason of suicide and depression of those who are admitted. I dont know for tourism reason why not but im afraid it will undermine our culture of taking care of our olds. If it will be an option later on. then we will end up being there in the future, but if we continue to teach our children to take care of the old as a form of gratitude to them then i guess it will be better.

  4. #4
    Administrator rolour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 09, 2003
    Location
    Lake in the Hills, IL
    Posts
    13,348
    Blog Entries
    35

    Default Re: Nursing homes in the Philippines?

    Welcome, paypjr. Glad to have you on-board .

    As to the nursing home, I think the idea here is to cater to foreigners like Japanese, Taiwanese, etc.. Filipinos will not welcome the idea so catering to our countrymen is not even considered. You have foreign clients but local co-workers are providing the manpower. As stated in the article above, the Japanese are already welcoming the idea. The problem is if there are willing investors...
    Please do not PM me for any questions regarding this site or inquiries that's related to the College of the Medicine. Please post your questions in our Forum or the comments section after each article. Thank you.

    flick
    r

  5. #5
    Administrator rolour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 09, 2003
    Location
    Lake in the Hills, IL
    Posts
    13,348
    Blog Entries
    35

    Default Re: Nursing homes in the Philippines?

    Please do not PM me for any questions regarding this site or inquiries that's related to the College of the Medicine. Please post your questions in our Forum or the comments section after each article. Thank you.

    flick
    r

  6. #6

    Default

    Hi guys, it’s really good that you are thinking about putting nursing home which will be operated by doctors but I would like to suggest you that why not make it open for all communities like it should be opened for foreigners as well as local people should also get equal treatment there. I think it would be much better to serve the local community firs. There are some concerns over nursing care today in terms of quality of services and the level of management they have.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by radenip View Post
    I am with you on this.

    Actually, a few years back a group of doctors talked about putting up a nursing home, but their target was the elderly pinoys. Well, when they started asking around about the feasibility of doing so, they got frustrated with the reactions of family members. Our culture is entirely different from those in the west. Here we are expected and usually do take care of our old parents or relatives in our houses. Needless to say, the plan never took off.

    Now, catering to elderly Japanese and others, that is a different story. We have enough spaces and manpower to handle it ( just look at the many sprouting caretaker courses being offered left and right). But the big question is how would be willing to invest in such an endeavor?
    It certainly is true that in our culture as Filipinos we take care of our own elderly- go anywhere from Aparri to Jolo and you'd see multi-generational Filipino families living under one roof. The idea of putting our Lolas and Lolos in a nursing home is not very desirable because taking care of them in the twilight of their lives shows our respect and values like utang na loob to the persons who gave us life... On the other hand, westerners are much more open to the idea.

    I think its a good thing to be able to provide jobs for thousands of health professionals in our country- a better alternative to leaving abroad for jobs. Plus, it is in our nature to be caring and compassionate and the tropical climate is also desirable. It won't be far along, I guess. Right now in Calicoan island in Guian, Samar (with landscapes that rival Palawan) have massive developments related to medical tourism catering to Korean clients. I'm sure one day we'd see a plane full of retirees seeking long-term stay in our beautiful country.

  8. #8

    Default

    Yes Greendestinyph, I agree with you on the point there are some fundamental differences in the thoughts of westerners and people like you over there. You people believe in taking care of your elder parents at your own home while they believe to put their elder parents to either putting in care Homes or hire a caregiver to take care of them. People do not understand that being with parents will give their parents pleasure.






    Nursing homes

  9. #9

    Default

    The Philippines is a 3rd world country. I don't think their government will have enough funds to be able to make this happen. If they do so, I'm not confident with the quality of this. It may be feasible as a private company and only for the rich.

  10. #10
    Administrator rolour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 09, 2003
    Location
    Lake in the Hills, IL
    Posts
    13,348
    Blog Entries
    35

    Default

    Just curious. How did you find this site?
    Please do not PM me for any questions regarding this site or inquiries that's related to the College of the Medicine. Please post your questions in our Forum or the comments section after each article. Thank you.

    flick
    r

  11. #11

    Default

    Just found this thread because I'm currently looking for LTC facilities in the Philippines. I'm honestly planning on going back in the Phils maybe 4-6 years from now. I don't know but I really like it back home and am planning on working as a Dietary manager in a LTC facility if there is any, or maybe pursue a degree as dietitian if ill be only studying not more than 3-4 years. I'm currently studying Food and Nutrition management here in toronto. Hope in the coming years nursing homes will be more known and established in the phils so there will be more jobs for our healthcare people.

    Bookmarked!

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rolour View Post
    Many, many years ago while on vacation back home, I met a wealthy politician (who isn't?) who broached the idea of putting up nursing homes in the Philippines. For foreigners, that is. Japanese, Taiwanese, Europeans, etc. He said then that Japan, for example, is getting too crowded and the old folks want a peaceful existence as senior citizens in a quiet place. My place is perfect, he said, as he bragged about a vast piece of land he owns at a resort town somewhere in southern Luzon. Well, I thought then, if you have the money it's worth a try. He asked about how nursing homes operate in the U.S., how much do patients pay, etc.

    The politician was serious with his plans until he fell from grace - lost the elections, his other businesses went down, and members of his family were murdered by, allegedly, political rivals. And I never heard from him again.

    I really thought the idea would work, but with no investors willing to risk their money, that was the end of it. So it was with great interest that I read a recent article from the Manila Bulletin - Medical tourism in the Philippines. You may read the full article by clicking the link but part of it reads below:



    Seriously now, will nursing homes for foreigners in the Philippines work? And since these foreigners are moneyed themselves, employees' (doctors, nurses) salaries will probably approximate "american salaries" as well. Who's with me?

    Hey guys i just want to tell you more about the nursing homes, what they are actually.A nursing home is primarily set up to provide health care facilities to older adults outside of a hospital. In this busy world when we all are busy chasing our careers and dreams, it is value, love and sense of responsibility that turns us towards our elderly, who are at a stage in their life when they require utmost care, love and most importantly right medical facilities.

    ____________
    Nursing Homes

  13. #13

    Default

    My 78 yr. old father is in a nursing home up in Florida and it costs about $175 a day there. What would your cost structure be in the Philippines if you were to start a nursing home there?
    I want to walk into a room, be it a hospital for the dying or a hospital for the sick children, and feel that I am needed. I want to do, not just to be. ~Princess Diana

  14. #14
    Administrator rolour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 09, 2003
    Location
    Lake in the Hills, IL
    Posts
    13,348
    Blog Entries
    35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by diabetic77 View Post
    My 78 yr. old father is in a nursing home up in Florida and it costs about $175 a day there. What would your cost structure be in the Philippines if you were to start a nursing home there?
    I can't really answer that. But like everything else, it will be relatively cheaper if you're bringing dollars over. I've heard of "hospitels" (hospital + hotel) setup but not of any nursing home. It's somehow against the Filipino culture to just leave your parents or grandparents to the care of other people in nursing homes. Maybe the outlook has changed. I've not kept up with this idea since I moved to the US in 1996. I hope somebody chimes in here.
    Please do not PM me for any questions regarding this site or inquiries that's related to the College of the Medicine. Please post your questions in our Forum or the comments section after each article. Thank you.

    flick
    r

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Nursing or Medicine? help..
    By hassy06 in forum College Applicants
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Apr 01, 2011, 10:59 AM
  2. Latest newspaper articles re: Doctors - Nurses
    By iskulmeyt'88 in forum Current Events
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: Dec 10, 2007, 07:11 PM
  3. Landslide buries homes, school in Philippines
    By rolour in forum Current Events
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Feb 18, 2006, 07:47 PM
  4. Philippines host 23rd SEAG
    By radenip in forum Current Events
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Dec 08, 2005, 02:15 AM
  5. Doctor-topnotcher leaving as nurse
    By rolour in forum . . . and Beyond
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Mar 23, 2004, 03:59 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •